Still Crazy

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Italy's fanatic of Grappa thirty years on

I don’t need another liquid pleasure—the world of wine is big enough.

But I recently visited Vittorio Gianni Capovilla in northern Italy and discovered another realm of complex aromas and flavors, in Capovilla’s prized grappas and other distilled spirits.

“Taste this,” said Capovilla. At 70, with his bushy eyebrows and gleaming gray eyes, he looked like a mad scientist as he held out samples of some of the world’s most sought-after distillati. Over 30 years, Capovilla has helped raise grappa—traditionally a lowly spirit made from the grape pomace (skins, pulp, seeds and stems) left over after winemaking—to distinctive levels. Part of his success comes from his slow, low-temperature distillation technique and part of it from impeccable ingredients.

What kind of ingredients? His grappa di Amarone is distilled from the pomace of legendary Amarone producer Romano Dal Forno and his grappa di Ribolla from another legend, Friuli’s Gravner.

After a few sips—and then a few more—I became a believer. Great grappa can show off nuanced flavors.

In his centuries-old farmhouse-turned-distillery near Bassano del Grappa, in the Veneto region, he also produces other distillati from a variety of fresh fruits such as wild raspberries and blueberries, heirloom variety peaches, mirabelle plums and loquats, as well as from beer. “The world of distillati is infinite..." read the full blog (free) at winespectator.com